Project Details

Project Time line / Milestones

  • Summer 2014 – Estimated completion of the restoration with a reunion of the families and those who make the project possible.
  • Autumn 2011 – Finish restoration of the basement and exterior of the Hanson House
  • Summer 2011 – Once weather permits, begin work on the foundation and basement
  • 15 Dec 2009 – The Historical, Architectural Analysis, And Restoration Plan for the Hans Hanson House (15 Dec 2009) was completed.
  • Aug 2009 — The Hanson House was photographed, measured, and evaluated by Alan Pape
  • 2002 — The land with the Hanson House was acquired by the Sturgeon Bay Educational Foundation to be added to Heritage Village at Big Creek complex; at the time, the significance of house was not known

The 15 Dec 2009 Report

Here is a copy of the The Historical, Architectural Analysis, And Restoration Plan for the Hans Hanson House (15 Dec 2009) Prepared by Alan Pape for The Door County Historical Society. Please note, the pdf is large (5 MB) so consider that before downloading.


General Restoration Guidelines

Taken from The Historical, Architectural Analysis, And Restoration Plan for the Hans Hanson House (15 Dec 2009) Prepared by Alan Pape for The Door County Historical Society.

Restoration Plan. Picture from The Historical, Architectural Analysis, And Restoration Plan for the Hans Hanson House, 15 Dec 2009 Prepared by Alan Pape for The Door County Historical Society.

Restoration Plan. Picture from The Historical, Architectural Analysis, And Restoration Plan for the Hans Hanson House, 15 Dec 2009 Prepared by Alan Pape for The Door County Historical Society.

More interior and exterior demolition needs to be done in 2010. The hard wood floors need to be carefully pulled up, using protection blocks under the crow bars. Most of the second floor partitions need to be removed except for those shown on the plan for Phase III. The new west additions and the north entry areas all need to be removed and the basement access filled after a new stone and mortar basement wall is erected. (see west elevation plans). All electrical wires and plumbing needs to be removed. The entire roofing, including the south gable dormer, is removed only keeping the original roof sheathing. Find the size and location of the second floor chimney. Remove some of the second floor lath and plaster walls as shown in plan drawings. Look for early stove, door, and partition locations on painted floor surfaces. Look for early stairway parts recycled into new wall. Do not remove anymore of the partition wall that was dividing rooms F & G. Carefully save those original parts for replication and any other square nailed trim parts that give clues to what is now missing.

  • Log work — The final interior log wall appearances will require extensive log replacement with new log infill and repair. Such things as repairing rotted and week base logs needs to be done including the west base log corner notch, sill timbers in the forstue walls, and replacing missing logs in the south and east walls. A restoration carpenter could actually make the new infill out of hand rafted horizontal boards because they will be coated with a thick layer of calcimine whitewash and the existing walls are sturdy enough to carry out this act of fakery.
  • Roofing — Re-shingle the roof after infill roof boards are installed. Use # 1 edge grain 16″ western red wood shingles with a 4″ exposure and without any tar paper. Provide 1″ shingle overhang and a 1″ x 6″ red cedar ridge cap that hides metal flashing below. Build the brick chimney using cream bricks and buff colored white mortar. Use painted metal flashing custom formed around the chimney base. Install 6″ round galvanized metal rain gutters with the straps under the shingles.
  • Siding — The house should be resided using 1/2″ x 6″ planned #1 pine boards with 5″ exposure and full 1″ x 4″ vertical corner trim broads . If it seem impossible to find the pine siding, modern beveled red cedar siding can be used with 5″ exposure. Prime both sides of the siding before installation. Counter sink any exposed galvanized nail heads and fill with putty before the the first coat of off white semi-gloss exterior Benjamin Moore latex paint.
  • Masonry — Please note this and insist that all masonry work use heavy quantities of the old fashioned lime based mortar. Insist that the mason’s provide finished sample mixtures before any work begins. Match these samples to the original foundation mortar for color and texture. Do not let the mason’s talk you into using regular type “M” masons mortar .

Paint Plan

  • Exterior — Prime all new wood with a good grade of oil base primer. Finish with off-white semi-gloss, exterior Benjamin Moore latex paint. (#969).
  • Interior — Prime all new wood with a good grade of oil base primer. All new paints shall be Benjamin Moore semi-gloss interior latex paint.
  • Room A — Calcimine whitewashed walls, floor walnut stain (HC-68), ceiling joists, ceiling board wall nailer beaded trim, partition, door and window trim light olive gray (HC-86).
  • Room B — Whitewashed log walls, floor walnut stain (HC-68), ceiling and joists, partitions, door and window trim, base trim, butterscotch (#I 96).
  • Room C — Whitewashed log walls except behind open shelving in SW corner, floor walnut stain (HC-68), ceiling and joists, partitions, door and window, and ceiling trim, base board trim and open shelving, butterscotch (#196).
  • Room D — same as above.
  • Room E — Whitewashed log walls, floor is left bare wood, ceiling, joists, partition, door and trim, butterscotch (#196).
  • Room F — Whitewashed walls, floor is bare wood, ceiling boards and trim, and partition, butterscotch,(# 196). Door and window and trim light gray (1461).
  • Room G — Whitewashed log wall and rough wall boards, floor stained walnut (HC-68), Partition, stairs risers, stair side wall and base trim, door and trim, butterscotch (#196).
  • Second floor Bedrooms — Unpainted floors and rough plaster walls and ceilings, doors, trim, windows and base bards light gray (HC-107).

Maintenance Guidelines

“Maintenance is Preservation” Water is the enemy. Do not allow any rain to splash onto the structure from nearby piles of fire wood or vegetation. Maintain the surrounding soil grade at more then 6″ between the sill log, siding and the soil. Install screens on several removable basement windows to allow cross ventilation during summer months. Any wood containing more than 20% moisture content will host insect and bacterial growth.

Keep rain gutters and down spouts clear of leaves and deflect rain water at least four feet away from basement walls. Make sure the grade is sloped away from the house.

Subscribe to the free Schroeder Log Home Supply Catalog 1-800-359-6614 for sources of preservation supplies. Spray the entire exterior of the house with “Tim-Bor Wood Treatment” before it is sided over. Do not use any product that changes the appearance or is a health hazard.

Every five years inspect the basement walls for signs of moisture and wood ceiling joists/posts and flooring far signs of insect activity.

Landscape Guidelines

Use 1870-1900 old photos of Door County farms to help plan landscape designs. Interview elderly Norwegian/American farmers in the area about their farm layout and landscaping. Do not let the local garden club plan or plant the site. They can however, be encouraged to help maintain the garden and simple plantings. Landscape elements that contribute to the “Living History” feel of the site include: wash line poles, fire wood piles/shed, vegetable garden, fencing types found in area, wooden walk ways, an outdoor toilet, various small farm buildings for chickens, hogs, work shop and horse stable.

Project cost estimate

Based on $100.00 per square foot. Total cost for contracted and some volunteer work on the 1,350 square foot building is $135,000.

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